22
Jun

22 JUNE 1483

   Posted by: Lawrence Osborn   in Events in History

Public statement outside St Paul’s Cathedral that Edward IV had been married to Eleanor Talbot when he married Elizabeth Woodville, declaring the children of Edward IV and Elizabeth Woodville illegitimate.  This meant that Richard was the next legitimate heir to the throne.  He was offered the crown by the Commons and became King Richard III.

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20
Jun

20 JUNE 1214

   Posted by: Lawrence Osborn   in Events in History

Charter granted to the University of Oxford to appoint a chancellor by Nicholas de Romanis, the papal legate.

Though it is not known when exactly Oxford University was founded, there is evidence of teaching from as early as 1096.  The early structure of the university is impossible to ascertain.  In 1209 there is evidence that by 2 January 1201, a John Grim held the title magister scolorum Oxonie (master of schools of Oxford), which indicates that he was the head of all the schools of Oxford.

The papal legate enhanced the status of the office of the master of schools by his award of 1214, which was accepted and sanctioned by the Bishop of Lincoln, Hugh of Wells.

Source:

M.B. Hackett, ‘The University as a Corporate Body’, in: The Early Oxford Schools, Volume I, ed by J.I.Catto, Oxford University Press, 1984, pp.37-95.  ISBN 0-19-951011-3

The photograph shows the Sheldonian Theatre, Oxford  (© Dorothea Preis)

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18
Jun

18 JUNE 1468

   Posted by: Lawrence Osborn   in Events in History

Margaret of York, sister of Edward IV and Richard III, leaves London on her journey to Burgundy to marry Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy.  Edward IV allies himself with Burgundy and Brittany against Louis XI of France (the ‘Spider King’).

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17
Jun

Farewell to John Shaw

   Posted by: Julia Redlich   in Branch News, News

Members of the New South Wales branch of the Richard III Society will be sad to hear of the passing of John Shaw, the husband of long-time member Margaret Shaw.

John Eric Shaw was an Antarctic Researcher and a scientist with CSIRO. He was not a member of our Society, but a welcome attendee at many of our occasions celebrating events in the life and times of Richard III. John’s knowledge and humour made his company such a pleasure. How we missed him when his health prevented him from joining us.

Many of us have partners, family, and friends who, even when if not members of the Richard III Society, give us interested support that is beyond value. Our love and thoughts are with Margaret (“Maggie”) and her and John’s large and loving family.

Julia Redlich

16
Jun

16 JUNE 1487

   Posted by: Lawrence Osborn   in Events in History

Battle of Stoke Field, Nottinghamshire, between the Yorkists on behalf of “Edward VI” and the Tudor government troops.  On the Yorkist side, John de la Pole, 1st Earl of Lincoln, a nephew of both Edward IV and Richard III, was killed.  He had been considered heir to the throne of Richard III after the death of Edward of Middleham.  It is not quite clear who “Edward VI” actually claimed to be.  According to Tudor sources he was said to pretend to be Edward, the son of George, Duke of Clarence.  As the real Edward was locked up in the Tower, this was impossible.  There is no surviving evidence who his own supporters said he was.

Bibliography:  Smith, G, ‘Lambert Simnel and the King from Dublin’. The Ricardian, Vol. X, No.135 (December 1996) , pp. 498-536.

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16
Jun

16 JUNE 1483

   Posted by: Lawrence Osborn   in Events in History

Elizabeth Woodville allows her younger son Richard to quit sanctuary at Westminster and join his brother Edward at the Tower.

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13
Jun

TROUBADOUR, by Isolde Martyn

   Posted by: Lawrence Osborn   in Bookworm

troubadour cover0001TROUBADOUR, by Isolde Martyn,
Published by Harlequin Mira, rrp $24.95.ISBN 9781489220370

Members of the New South Wales branch of the Richard III Society will have read and enjoyed our fellow member Isolde Martyn’s historical novels. Most of them have concerned real people from the period that interests us most: from Katherine Bonville to the Duke of Buckingham,  and women who play a role in Edward IV’s life – Elysabeth Woodville and Elizabeth “Jane Shore” Lambard. Her presentation of real characters and the events of their time in English history is always combines romance with impeccable research.
Now be prepared to take a step back a century or two  to a world of deception and danger, love and loyalty where the violence and cruelty of a religious war not only appals us, but sadly seems so terrifyingly familiar.
At the centre of it all are Adela, a lowly attendant to King John’s queen, Isabella, and Richart (note this spelling is correct) Lord of Mirascon in the far south of France. They first see each other at Corfe Castle where Richart is negotiating an alliance with King John to protect his land and his people.
Fleeing England and the king’s lust, Adela makes her way to France where she joins the entourage of John’s discarded mistress Lady Alys. She is on her way south,destined for a political marriage with Richart, but a unexpected fiery and vicious attack leaves only a few survivors who finally reach Mirascon where  Adela, still beautiful despite all the dramatic hardships, is acclaimed as Alys, the Lord of Mirascon’s bride to be.
No more plot lines from now on! But know you will meet both loving and evil kinsfolk, memorable historical characters, some traveling troubadours ( whose genuine songs are important)  and some delightfully clever characters you may well wish were your friends. How they all fare in fighting for what is right against the massive army leading Pope Innocent III’s crusade  against the Cathars or Albigensians is told with ruthless reality –so be prepared. It is can be uncomfortable, even distressing –but as the pages turn,  reason, dreams and  love bring hope.

Note: Thanks to Isolde who, as always, provides a list of characters, real or otherwise, and a welcome glossary of medieval terms and translation from Occitan (the language of Languedoc at the time).

13
Jun

13 JUNE 1483

   Posted by: Lawrence Osborn   in Events in History

Execution of William, 1st Baron Hastings.   He was not attainted and his widow Katherine was placed under Richard’s protection.  With Hastings were arrested John Morton, Bishop of Ely, Thomas Rotherham, Archbishop of York, and Thomas Lord Stanley.  The reasons  and circumstances for his sudden execution remain controversial.  Peter Hancock’s theory that it was because Richard discovered that Hastings knew about the precontract between Edward IV and Eleanor Talbot, but had kept it secret from him, is certainly interesting.

Bibliography:

Peter A Hancock, Richard III and the Murder in the Tower.  The History Press, Stroud, 2009.  ISBN 978 0 7524 5148 0 (hardback)

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12
Jun

12 JUNE 1461

   Posted by: Lawrence Osborn   in Events in History

Richard and his brother George return to England from exile in Burgundy, where they had been sent for their safety after the Yorkist defeat at the Battle of Wakefield, West Yorkshire (30 December 1460).

The photograph shows Ghent (© Dorothea Preis)

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11
Jun

11 JUNE 1915

   Posted by: Lawrence Osborn   in Events in History

RIII Memorial Stone, Leicester Cathedral

RIII Memorial Stone, Leicester Cathedral

David Guy Barnabas Kindersley, stone-carver and type designer, born in Codicote, Hertfordshire. Among his work is the Richard III Memorial Stone, which used to be in Leicester Cathedral.  The stone is now on loan to the King Richard III Visitor Centre,which also allows access to Richard’s original grave

In the Ricardian Bulletin of December 1982 Jeremy Potter in his AGM report said the following:

“The Leicester Memorial Stone, carved by David Kindersley, dedicated in August, was not a Society project, but that of the Rev T.C.Hunter-Clare; however the Society was glad to have been able to contribute and had much appreciated the dedication service.”

At the previous year’s AGM he said: “The Society had made an initial small donation and a larger later one”.

Around this time the  Leicester Statue fund was wound up and it was agreed the residue would be used for special projects “such as the Leicester Cathedral Memorial and Fotheringhay Chapel.”

More information on David Kindersley: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/obituariesdavid-kindersley-1571426.html

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