8
Dec

8 DECEMBER 1542

   Posted by: Michael   in Events in History

Birth of Mary Stewart, Queen of Scots, at Linlithgow Linlithgow_Palace (D Preis)Palace.  She was the daughter of James V, king of Scots, and Mary of Guise and their only surviving child.  Her father died just six days after her birth.

Mary was executed on 8 February 1587 in the great hall of Fotheringhay.

(Photograph of Linlithgow Palace © Dorothea Preis)

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6
Dec

6 DECEMBER 1421

   Posted by: Michael   in Events in History

Birth of Henry VI of England at Windsor

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28
Nov

28 NOVEMBER 1499

   Posted by: Michael   in Events in History

Edward, Earl of Warwick, son of George Duke of Clarence and Isabel Neville, is beheaded on Tower Green.  He was the last legitimate male of the House of Plantagenet.

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25
Nov

25 NOVEMBER 1487

   Posted by: Michael   in Events in History

Coronation of Elizabeth of York

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24
Nov

December Branch Meeting

   Posted by: Leslie McCawley   in Branch News, Meetings, News

Our December Branch Meeting will take place on 8 December 2018 at 2 pm at the Sydney Mechanics’ School of Arts, 280 Pitt Street, CBD (for a map go to our Upcoming Events page).

Our featured speaker for the last meeting of the year will be our own long-time branch member and long-serving executive committee member, Lynne Foley, who will give a presentation on some of the more colourful Christmas customs of the Ricardian era.

Please join us for this festive time of year!

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23
Nov

23 NOVEMBER 1511

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis   in Events in History

Death of Anne of York, the seventh child and fifth daughter of Edward IV and Elizabeth Woodville.  She shares her death date with her aunt Margaret, duchess of Burgundy, and – if Perkin Warbeck was indeed Richard of York – her brother.

Anne was born on 2 November 1475.  At not quite four years of age, she was betrothed to Philip (“the Handsome”),  the son of Mary of Burgundy (her aunt’s step-daughter) and Maximilian of Austria.  However, the plan was abandoned in 1482.  Richard III undertook to find a suitable marriage for her (and her sisters) and after Richard’s death she took part in ceremonies at Henry VII court, whose queen was her sister Elizabeth.

On 4 February 1495 she married Thomas Howard, who would eventually become the third duke of Norfolk.  He was the grandson of John Howard, an important supporter of Richard III.  John fell at the battle of Bosworth, fighting for Richard.  His son, Thomas (the father of Anne’s Thomas), had also fought for Richard, had been attainted, but managed to be restored to his title.  His son’s marriage to a sister-in-law of Henry Tudor was obviously a great achievement in his family’s rehabilitation.  Anne and Thomas had no children.

Reference: ODNB on ‘Howard, Thomas, third duke of Norfolk (1473–1554)’

The above picture shows the daughters of Edward IV and Elizabeth Woodville in a window in Canterbury Cathedral.  Anne is the third from left. (picture obtained through Wikimedia Commons)

Dorothea Preis

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23
Nov

23 NOVEMBER 1503

   Posted by: Michael   in Events in History

Margaret of York, Duchess of Burgundy, dies at Malines.  She was a sister of Edward IV and Richard III.  After Richard’s death she supported the Yorkist pretenders.  She was on very good terms with her husband’s daughter and her family and had a successful and positive influence on Burgundian politics.  She was a patron of William Caxton, who introduced the printing press to England.

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23
Nov

23 NOVEMBER 1499

   Posted by: Michael   in Events in History

A young man identified by the Tudors as Perkin Warbeck, who claimed to be Richard of York, the younger son of Edward IV and Elizabeth Woodville, is executed for treason at the Tower.

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22
Nov

22 NOVEMBER 1428

   Posted by: Michael   in Events in History

Birth of Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick, who became later known as ‘The Kingmaker’

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20
Nov

Richard III Albury 2018 Conference

   Posted by: Julia Redlich   in Branch News, Conventions, News

Albury conference, November 2018

 

A Regular Ricardian Reunion

In 2007 the New South Wales Branch started a biennial one-day conference for members unable to attend Australasian conventions because of distance. Other branches soon joined in and this year met again at the Albury Manor House Hotel with its wonderful medieval style – and a management that knows exactly what is wanted and provides it with bells on!

Arrivals were made special when Queensland member Mark Porter’s two little girls in medieval gowns offered everyone a white rose tied with maroon and blue ribbons, and their brother in “armour” and brandishing a “sword” presented red poppies for Remembrance Day provided by the Robyn Pidcock, Victoria’s tireless craft expert. We wore them proudly for an evening of wining, dining, conversation and enjoyable reunion.

Friday morning we all gathered in a room, with Richard’s banner taking pride of place. A historical quiz, prepared by Kevin Herbert, was handed out for completion during the day. Sadly, Kevin was not present due to the recurrence of a medical condition, but fellow branch members, Marnie and Chris Lo, replaced his presentation with their recent “How to rebury a medieval king”.

In the absence of NSW Branch chairperson, Judith Hughes, the Australasian vice president, New Zealand’s Rob Smith welcomed everyone on her behalf and read a goodwill message from Phil Stone. Then Helen Portus and Denise Rawling, organisers of the event, started proceedings them with a light-hearted history of the Wars of the Roses. LOL!

A variety of presentations by delegates included Queensland’s Peter Stride enlightening us with the natural history of scoliosis – and later in the day made us begin to query a few Royal paternities. Julia Redlich from NSW spoke on medieval mothers and the possible reasons for their rotten reputations. Victoria Branch member Michael Iliffe considered Henry VI who unwittingly sparked the Cousins’ War, and NSW’s Dorothea Preis inspired us with reasons for future trips to the UK to visit Richard III’s mother Cecily, Duchess of York’s home in Berkhamsted. Anne Maslin from Victoria spoke on the rise and fall of John Howard , and Mark Porter sought answers from Rob Smith , Julia Redlich, Sue Walladge (South Australia), Victoria’s Ron and Robyn Pidcock and Louise Carson from Western Australia on why they became Ricardians. The day closed as Helen and Denise brought us up to date with how Richard III is viewed in the digital age.

The Branch sales table had been well patronised and only one item remained (a book about a Tudor, so that’s understandable!). Many raffle tickets had been sold and winners each received one from a covetable selection of prizes.

Many wore medieval costume for a delicious banquet, when the toasts to the Society, Richard III and Absent Friends were proposed by Sue Walladge, Ron Pidcock OAM and Louise Carson. Returning to the conference room the quiz answers were given as a PowerPoint presentation created by webmaster Mike Redstone. And the winner: Gillian Laughton from Victoria.

The conference concluded with a memorable tribute to John Ashdown-Hill MBE that Helen had produced. All Ricardians will miss John for his knowledge, writing, hard work on our behalf and his role in presenting Richard III in such a positive way to the world.

Saturday meant many of the delegates had to return home, but several stayed on for a coach tour that took in local landmarks, a wonderful winery, a delightful lunch and a trip around Albury, a place offering so much. Would it be too much to expect that Ricardians gather there again in the not too distant future?

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