18
Nov

18 NOVEMBER 1477

   Posted by: Lawrence Osborn   in Events in History

William Caxton produces Dictes or Sayengis of the Philosophres, one of the first books printed on a printing press in England.

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15
Nov

15 NOVEMBER 1527

   Posted by: Lawrence Osborn   in Events in History

Death of Katherine of York at Tiverton Castle, Devon.   Katherine was the 9th child and 6th daughter of King Edward IV and Elizabeth Woodville, born in 1479, probably at Eltham Palace. She was married in 1495 to Sir William Courtenay.

Though a staunch supporter of Henry VII, William was suspected of being involved in the conspiracy of the Yorkist claimant Edmund de la Pole.   He was attainted and spent the rest of Henry VII’s reign in prison.  He was released after the accession of Henry VIII in 1509 and was created earl of Devon on 10 May 1511.  However, he had not long to enjoy his new status and died a month later on 9 June 1511.

The couple had three children, including Henry Courtenay who was executed by orders of Henry VIII in 1539

After her husband’s death, Katherine took a vow of chastity and enjoyed a life of luxury and hunting, but also religious devotion.  On surviving documents she called herself ‘the excellent Princess Katherine, Countess of Devon, daughter, sister and aunt of kings’.

She was buried at St Peter’s Church, Tiverton.

Source:  ODNB on ‘Katherine, countess of Devon (1479–1527)’ by Margaret R. Westcott.

(Picture of Katherine of York obtained through Wikimedia Commons)

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11
Nov

11 NOVEMBER 1483

   Posted by: Lawrence Osborn   in Events in History

Baptism of Martin Luther in Eisleben, Germany, from which his date of birth, 10 November 1483, is deducted.

He disputed the claim of the (Catholic) church that salvation could be purchased by indulgences, instead salvation is a free gift by God, received by faith in Jesus, who has redeemed our sins.  He explained his view in the 95 thesis, which he nailed on the church door in Eisleben in the evening of 31 October 1517, the evening before All Saints’ Day, when everyone would come to church.   This is often regarded as the starting point of the reformation.  While his original aim was to reform the church, the Pope saw it differently, which ultimately led to the split with the Catholic church.  As Luther was of the opinion that the Bible was the only source for knowledge of God, he translated it into German to make it accessible to everyone.

He died on 15 February 1546.

You can find out more at http://www.luther.de/en/

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10
Nov

10 NOVEMBER 1480

   Posted by: Lawrence Osborn   in Events in History

Birth of Bridget of York, tenth child and seventh daughter of Edward IV and Elizabeth Woodville, at Eltham Palace, London.   She became a nun at Dartford Priory.  Died in 1517.

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7
Nov

7 NOVEMBER 1485

   Posted by: Lawrence Osborn   in Events in History

By this date Katherine Woodville is married to Henry Tudor’s uncle, Jasper Tudor.  Katherine was the sister of Elizabeth Woodville and the widow of Henry Stafford, second duke of Buckingham.

Source: ODNB on Henry Stafford, Henry, second duke of Buckingham

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7
Nov

7 NOVEMBER 1469

   Posted by: Lawrence Osborn   in Events in History

Richard is made justiciar of north Wales for life by his brother, Edward IV

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7
Nov

7 NOVEMBER 1448

   Posted by: Lawrence Osborn   in Events in History

Birth of John Plantagenet – son  of Richard, duke of York, and Cecily Neville.  He died young.

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6
Nov

6 NOVEMBER 1429

   Posted by: Lawrence Osborn   in Events in History

Coronation of Henry VI

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Review of the Australasian Ricardians’ Convention in Perth, WA,

October 2017

Sunshine, spring flowers and the Swan River before us augured well for the biennial convention of the Australasian Branches of the Richard III Society in October 2017, this time hosted by the Western Australia Branch at the Intercontinental Hotel on the Water, Ascot.

Australasian Ricardians’ Convention in Perth

The Swan River near the convention venue

The usual suspects from New Zealand, Victoria and New South Wales gathered on Friday 13th – lucky for all of us! – for a meet and greet evening, chatting with new friends and catching up with old ones. And all of us marvelling at the beautifully decorated folders filled with information and goodies presented to all delegates.

Saturday morning meant an early start, some first aid for equipment, and more welcoming words from WA chairman Terry Johnson before Mark Porter from Queensland presented an extract from his memorable four-part programme “The Search for Richard III: One Man’s Journey”. This was followed by a comprehensive survey of Thomas St Leger and his family (Jenny Gee, WA).

After a morning tea break, we learned about the foundation and purpose of William and Alice de la Pole’s God’s House at Ewelme (Dorothea Preis, NSW). The charm and serenity from her photos placed this on many “must see” lists for UK visits. Anne Maslin (Vic) followed with a report on Chancellor Russell’s draft speech to the Parliament that never sat in 1483 before a coronation of a king that never was (Edward V). A copy should probably be essential reading for present and potential politicians! Louise Carson (WA) gave a summary of the Popes during Richard’s lifetime that was enlightening and occasionally alarming. Who could have realised there were so many of them?

A light lunch in the spectacular Watermark restaurant was followed by a slightly re-adjusted programme after a presenter was held up by business commitments. The Loving Brother? was a subject considered by Carole Carson (WA), and we then had a brilliant introduction to Medieval Heraldry to inspire us in identifying all those colours and designs and their significance. The nine Dukes of Gloucester were presented by Julia Redlich (NSW) as mere historical footnotes (with two notable exceptions!) but whose mismarriages and too early deaths brought unexpected changes to history.

Australasian Ricardians’ Convention in Perth

Denise Rawling (NSW) and the banner

Afternoon tea (more delicious scones, jam, cream and pastries) was followed by a skilful presentation by Helen Portus and Denise Rawling (NSW) on “A New Kingdom: Richard and the Digital Age” that showed how recent events have changed the way the public can change their attitude to him. Entertaining and enlightening.

Two hours after this session ended we met for pre-dinner drinks before a banquet that was a splendid affair, the majority of delegates in medieval costume. We were entertained by a lively and seemingly inexhaustible Jester, but naturally, the highlights were the traditional toasts that included Her Majesty the Queen of Australia and New Zealand, The Richard III Society, our patron, HRH Prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester and King Richard III.
Our final day began with the results of the two quizzes included in the delegate folders. These had been assessed overnight but only the winners were announced. Many longed to know the answers to know where they failed dismally! Maybe we’ll learn in a future WA newsletter…

Raffle winning tickets were drawn to win the fantastic supply of prizes, and certificates of appreciated handed to the various presenters.

The Victoria Branch then took centre stage with a brilliant performance of The Battle of Towton. Michael Iliffe’s inspired idea (with a little help from his friends) followed the progress of this pivotal battle in the Cousins’ War in modern mode – with switches from newsrooms in media headquarters to reporters on the ground and viewing the progress of the Yorkists through the snow from a helicopter. Maps, photos and music added to the two-part presentation that was warmly applauded.

Australasian Ricardians’ Convention in Perth

The present author (NSW) and Rob Smith, Vice President of the Richard III Society (NZ) at the convention banquet

A suitable follow-up was a final talk on medieval fighting and battlefield medical assistance given by Terry Johnson before he handed over to Australasian Vice President Rob Smith for Business and time to cover continuing financial and relevant matters with the Executive Committee in the UK. He also congratulated the Western Australia Branch of hosting such a memorable few days for us all, and thanked the Victoria Branch for offering to hold the next Convention in 2019.

A last lunch before a few delegates made reluctant farewells while others spent a restful or exploratory afternoon before meeting for an informal dinner in the evening. As always, it had been a memorable time for us all linked by our loyalty to the last Plantagenet king that has made us friends with so many others around the world

29
Oct

A Look Back in Pleasure

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis   in News

Two weeks ago, I had the pleasure to attend the Australasian Convention of the Richard III Society in Perth, WA.  I think I can speak for all who attended when I say that we had a great time.  Our thanks go to the WA Branch for hosting this convention.  I am sure we will be able to post a more detailed review of this wonderful weekend here shortly.

A Look Back in Pleasure

Richard III’s banner was flying at the Convention

For me personally, the highlight was Mark Porter’s talk about making the video “Searching for Richard III – One Man’s Journey”.  He gave us the tantalising hint that we would have to watch the video to find out why he thinks that Richard III was innocent of being involved in the death of his nephews, the two sons of Edward IV.  However, there is much more to the video.  For those of us, who have been to the places shown, seeing the sights and events of Ricardian significance will bring back many happy memories.  And for those who haven’t visited them (yet), they give a much better understanding than any book can.

You can watch the video in four parts on YouTube:

Episode 1:  “Bosworth” – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgMVLxiG_1s

Episode 2:  “Leicester” – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uAeAW3Til2I

Episode 3:  “York” – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H9GySRYEipU

Episode 4:  “The Man” – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lTA0W2l1RJs

At the convention, Mark also talked in quite a bit of detail about the significance of Richard owning a Wycliffe Bible, which I found especially interesting.  I would have liked to find out more about this topic, but I suppose it is something which can be looked at more extensively in future.

Watching the video was definitely a pleasure, a pleasure of remembering good times.

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