17
Jul

17 JULY 1453

   Posted by: Michael   in Events in History

Battle of Castillon, Aquitaine, the last battle of the 100 Years’ War between the House of Valois and the House of Plantagenet for the French throne.  John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, and father of Eleanor Talbot (Butler), is killed.

Bibliography:  John Ashdown-Hill, Eleanor – The Secret Queen. The History Press, 2009  ISBN 978-0752448664 (hardback)

IllustrationThe Death  of John Talbot at the Battle of Castillon, by Charles-Philippe Larivière (1798-1876)

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16
Jul

16 JULY 1557

   Posted by: Michael   in Events in History

Death of Anna von Kleve (Anne of Cleves), the fourth wife of Henry VIII, at Chelsea Manor.  She was not even 42 years old.  She was buried at Westminster Abbey.

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14
Jul

14 JULY 1471

   Posted by: Michael   in Events in History

Richard, Duke of Gloucester, receives all the lands in Yorkshire and Cumberland, which had belonged to Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick, from his father’s side.

 

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12
Jul

12 JULY 1469

   Posted by: Michael   in Events in History

Marriage of George, Duke of Clarence (brother of Edward IV and Richard III), to Isabel Neville, elder daughter of Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick (‘The Kingmaker’), and Anne Beauchamp, at Calais.  The ceremony took place in secret, as King Edward IV, had explicitly forbidden the marriage.  It was conducted by George Neville, Archbishop of York.

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10
Jul

10 JULY 1460

   Posted by: Michael   in Events in History

Battle of Northampton, where John Talbot, 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury, and half-brother of Eleanor Talbot (Butler), met his death on the Lancastrian side.  Yorkist victory.

A short description of the various battles of the Wars of the Roses can be found on the website of the Richard III Society.

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7
Jul

7 JULY 1447

   Posted by: Michael   in Events in History

Birth of William Plantagenet,  4th son of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York and Cecily Neville.  He died young.

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6
Jul

6 JULY 1535

   Posted by: Michael   in Events in History

Execution of Thomas More, former Chancellor to Henry VIII, for denying that the king (Henry VIII) was the Supreme Head of the Church of England.  He was born on 7 February 1478.

Between c. 1513 and 1518 he wrote The History of King Richard III.  The work was not finished and only published posthumously by his son-in-law in 1557.  It is not a first-hand account, as he was only aged seven when Richard III fell at the Battle of Bosworth.  It is unknown for what purpose More wrote the History, as it contains many obvious untruths, which any reader at the time it was written would have recognized as such.  However, his work had a long-lasting influence in blackening Richard reputation.  It is therefore perhaps quite ironic that his downfall came on the anniversary of King Richard III’s coronation.

Source:  ODNB on Sir Thomas More

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6
Jul

6 JULY 1483

   Posted by: Michael   in Events in History

Coronation of King Richard III and Queen Anne.  Their coronation was one of the best attended on record. It was celebrated at Westminster Hall, which was the traditional venue for coronation banquets from 1189 to 1821.  The feast celebrating Richard and Anne’s coronation was attended by approx. 3,000 guests, no coronation banquet since has attracted as  many guests.

Bibliography:  “Westminster Hall: Coronation Banquets“, www.parliament.uk

Illustration:  © Andrew Jamieson, http://www.jamiesongallery.com/ (used with permission)

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3
Jul

3 JULY 1468

   Posted by: Michael   in Events in History

Marriage of Margaret of York (sister of Edward IV and Richard III) to Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy, she was his third wife.  They had no children, but she acted as a protector of the Duchy after his death on 5 January 1477 for his daughter Mary, Duchess of Burgundy.

Bibliography:  Christine Weightman, Margaret of York:  The Diabolical Duchess.  Amberley Publishing, Chalford, 2009.  ISBN 978 1 84868 099 9 (paperback)

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3
Jul

3 JULY 1437

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis   in Events in History

William de la Pole and Alice Chaucer, later duke and duchess of Suffolk, were licenced to found an almshouse at Ewelme for thirteen poor men and two chaplains.  The almshouse was called God’s House.  The statutes of 1448 show that by then a grammar school was added.  The almshouse as well as the school exist to this day.

 

 

Cloister of the almshouse at Ewelme (© Dorothea Preis)

Source:  ODNB on Alice Chaucer, duchess of Suffolk

You can read more about God’s House on Dottie Tales.

Dorothea Preis

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