3
Jan

Death of Catherine of Valois

   Posted by: Michael   in Events in History

Death of Catherine of Valois

Marriage of Henry V and Catherine of Valois

Death of Catherine of Valois

On 3 January 1437, Catherine of Valois, mother of Henry VI, and grandmother of Henry Tudor, died in London.  She was buried at Westminster Abbey.

More information on Catherine of Valois here.

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2
Jan

Medieval Menu: Fresh Fish Rolls

   Posted by: Julia Redlich   in Medieval Menu, Medieval Miscellany

Ingredients

2 small fillets of white fish  per person, skin removed
2 cups vegetable stock
Lemon slices
Parsley to garnish
Vegetable stock*

*Use the bought variety if necessary, but if making it yourself, use young carrots, spring onions, a bay leaf, a little sage and chopped parsley. The liquid should be half water and half white wine.

Method

Roll each fillet firmly and secure with a toothpick. Place the fish in a pan and cover with the vegetable stock until fish is tender. Remove the fish rolls and set aside. Simmer the stock further until it is well reduced. Chill to form a jellied sauce.
Place the fish rolls on a serving platter and pour the sauce over them. Garnish with lemon slices and parsley.

Note 

If the aroma of cooking fish is not appreciated, cook in a “medieval” microwave according to the maker’s instructions.

The perfect accompaniment to the Fish Rolls is a Herb Salad

Gather a collection of herbs: parsley, sage, fennel, borage, mint, rosemary. And spring onions or a leek if in season.

Wash all the items well and then break them up into small pieces.

Place in a bowl and mix well with olive oil, adding a sprinkling of cider vinegar and a little salt before serving.

1
Jan

Death of George and Isabel’s Son

   Posted by: Michael   in Events in History

Death of George and Isabel's son

George of Clarence and Isabel Neville (stained glass at Cardiff Castle, © Wolfgang Sauber)

Death of George and Isabel’s Son

On 1 January 1477, Richard, the infant son of George, duke of Clarence, and Isabel Neville, died.  He was born on 6 October 1476.  His mother had died on 22 December 1476, two and a half months after his birth.

For more information on the marriage of George and Isabel you may wish to read Karen Clark’s blog.

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30
Dec

Battle of Wakefield

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis   in Events in History

Battle of Wakefield

Battle of Wakefield

The Battle of Wakefield was fought on 30 December 1460 in West Yorkshire.  Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York, and Edmund, Earl of Rutland, father and brother of Edward IV and Richard III, were killed.  Also killed was Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury.  Their heads were stuck on poles and displayed over Micklegate Bar, York, the Duke wearing a paper crown.

For a thorough analysis of the battle read Helen Cox, The Battle of Wakefield Revisited:  A Fresh Perspective on Richard of York’s Final Battle, December 1460. You can read more on Helen’s website here.

And for visitors we recommend:  Helen Cox, Walk Wakefield 1460:  A Visitor Guide to Battle-Related Sites

A short description of the various battles of the Wars of the Roses can be found on the website of the Richard III Society (you need to scroll down a bit).

Dorothea Preis

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29
Dec

Murder of Thomas Becket

   Posted by: Michael   in Events in History

Murder of Thomas Becket

Murder of Thomas Becket from an English psalter.

Murder of Thomas Becket

On 29 December 1170, Archbishop Thomas Becket was murdered in Canterbury Cathedral by four knights.

More information here.

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28
Dec

Westminster Abbey Consecrated

   Posted by: Michael   in Events in History

Westminster Abbey consecrated

Westminster Abbey (© D Preis)

Westminster Abbey Consecrated

On 28 December 1065, Westminster Abbey was consecrated under Edward the Confessor.

More information on Edward the Confessor and Westminster Abbey here.

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26
Dec

Birth of Frederick II

   Posted by: Michael   in Events in History

birth of Frederick II

Frederick II (from ‘De arte venandi cum avibus’)

Birth of Frederick II

Frederick of Hohenstaufen, later Frederick II, was born  on 26 December 1194 in Iesi, near Ancona, Italy, the son of the Emperor Henry VI. He was crowned Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II in 1220. He was one of the most powerful Emperors. He was an influential supporter of science and the arts. He died on 13 December 1250.

You can find the Encyclopaedia Britannica entry on Frederick II here.

 

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24
Dec

Season’s Greetings to all our readers

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis   in Events in History

Wishing all our readers a very merry Christmas

and lots of happiness and peace for the New Year.

 

 

Enjoy a carol from King’s College Chapel in Cambridge (click here).

Richard III was a generous benefactor of the building of the chapel, which had been started by Henry VI.  By the end of his reign the first six bays of the Chapel had reached full height and the first five bays, roofed with oak and lead, were in use. [1]  It was the Tudor kings, Henry VII and Henry VIII, who would eventually finish the chapel.

Note:

‘History of the Chapel’, King’s College Cambridge.  URL:  http://www.kings.cam.ac.uk/chapel/history.html [last accessed 23 November 2018]

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23
Dec

Review of 14 December 2019 Meeting

   Posted by: Rhonda Bentley   in Branch News, Meetings, News

“A Closer Look at the Roses Used as Symbols During the Wars of the Roses”

presented by Dianne Herbert

Dianne Herbert, a long standing member of the Richard III Society, introduced us to the Alba Semi-Plena, the rose we know of as the White Rose of York. It is not like the mass produced roses we know today, being much simpler but more perfumed. Roses are thought to have originated in Persia (Iran) about 35 million years old and were brought to the west by the Crusaders. The Middle East was a major producer of rosewater, rose attar (rose essence or rose oil) and rose petals, for use in medicine, as food and in cosmetics. The Alba doesn’t interbreed successfully with other roses.

Review of 14 December 2019 Meeting

Rosa ‘Semi-plena’ (Photo by A. Barra via Wikimedia Commons)

There are a number of stories associated with roses. Apparently, roses only started to produce thorns when evil appeared in the world. At the Feast of Heliogabalus (204 – 222), guests died after being smothered in rose petals. The oldest rose bush alive today was established by King Louis the Pious (King of the Franks) in 815, and is at Hildesheim Cathedral in Germany. In the Middle Ages, a rose suspended from the ceiling meant that those present were sworn to secrecy.

Review of 14 December 2019 Meeting

Thousand-year-old rose, Hildesheim (Photo by Bischöfliche Pressestelle Hildesheim via Wikimedia Commons)

Edmund Langley, 1st Duke of York was the first nobleman to use the White Rose of York. Edmund Crouchback, 1st Earl of Lancaster used the red rose (Rosa gallica). Margaret of Anjou was known as the Red Rose of Anjou. Edward IV’s wife, Elizabeth Woodville used a white rose. Edward IV’s mistress, Jane Shore was known as the Rose of London. And it was not until 1829 that the term “Wars of the Roses” was used, when Sir Walter Scott included the term in his novel Anne of Geierstein.

White Rose of York

There is a “Jacobite” or “Bonny Prince Charlie’s” rose, as well as a rose called “York and Lancaster”. Roses have been cultivated in China since the 11th century, and a Rose Museum has recently been opened in Beijing. Unfortunately, there are no native roses in the Southern Hemisphere.

It was interesting to learn about the history of roses and the white rose in particular. We could hear Dianne’s love of roses in her talk. Amongst other roses, she grows “Mr Lincoln”, “Duchess of Provence”, and the “Peace Rose”. I’m sure her garden is spectacular.

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22
Dec

22 DECEMBER 1550

   Posted by: Michael   in Events in History

Death of Edward Plantagenet (Richard of Eastwell) at Eastwell.  He is said to have claimed to be an illegitimate son of Richard III.

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