Posts Tagged ‘Richard III’

27
Sep

27 SEPTEMBER 1488

   Posted by: Michael    in Events in History

Death of William Hobbes, royal physician to Richard III.   Hobbes had a long career in the service of the House of York, first to Richard, duke of York, then to his sons Edward IV and Richard III.

He obviously remained proud of this service, even after Henry Tudor claimed the throne, as he asked for the following inscription on his tombstone:

Here lies William Hobbys, formerly physician and surgeon of the most illustrious duke of York, and his sons the most illustrious kings Edward IV and Richard III, whose souls may God protect, amen.

He was buried in Holy Trinity Priory, Aldgate, London.

Reference:

ODNB on  ‘Hobbes, William (d. 1488)’

His will can be found in:  Calendar of Wills Proved and Enrolled in the Court of Hustings, London, A.D. 1258-A.D. 1688, Volume 2, ed.by Reginald R Sharpe,  London, 1890, pp.590-591

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22
Sep

22 SEPTEMBER 1465

   Posted by: Michael    in Events in History

Enthronement of George Neville (brother of Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick, ‘The Kingmaker’) to the Archbishopric of York.  Around that time  Richard, Duke of Gloucester (later Richard III), began his time as page with Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick (‘The Kingmaker), at Middleham.  It is assumed that he stayed with Richard Neville until January 1469.

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8
Sep

8 SEPTEMBER 1483

   Posted by: Michael    in Events in History

8 SEPTEMBER 1483

York Minster (D. Preis)

Investiture of Richard III’s son Edward as prince of Wales.  After a solemn mass in York Minster, conducted by the Bishop of Durham, William Dudley, the royal family processed through the streets of York to the archbishop’s palace, where Edward was invested.

Reference:

A. J. Pollard, ‘Edward , prince of Wales (1474×6–1484)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004.  [accessed online 20 Jan. 2011]

 

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29
Aug

29 AUGUST 1479

   Posted by: Michael    in Events in History

Treaty of Picquigny between Louis XI of France and Edward IV, Edward IV and many of his nobles were paid a ‘pension’ to return to England and not to take up arms against France again in his claim to the French throne.  Richard Duke of Gloucester (later Richard III) is said to have opposed the treaty and refused the pension.

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25
Aug

Thursday, 25 August 1485

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis    in Events in History

ArchaeologyRichard III was buried in the choir of the church of the Grey Friars in Leicester. Polydore Vergil states that the burial was “without any pompe or solemn funeral”. This is often – mistakenly – seen to indicate that there were no religious rites. However, as John Ashdown-Hill explains, “solemnity” in the religious context refers to certain aspects of a service, which were not essential. It basically means that the service was a private ceremony by the friars, especially as a choir of their church would not have been open to the public.

To the day 527 years later, on 25 August 2012, on the first day of the archaeological dig in Leicester to find out where the church of the Grey Friars actually had been and hopefully to find Richard’s remains, parts of a human leg bone were unearthed. These were later identified as being part of the remains of Richard III.

Sources:

John Ashdown Hill, The Last Days of Richard III. The History Press, 2010, pp.91-96

Mathew Morris & Richard Buckley, Richard III:  The King under the Car Park.  University of Leicester Archaeological Services, 2013, pp.22 + 36-45

Mike Pitts, Digging for Richard: How Archaeology Found the King. Thames & Hudson, 2014, pp.99-105

Dorothea Preis

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24
Aug

24 AUGUST 1483

   Posted by: Michael    in Events in History

Richard III’s son Edward is created prince of Wales.

Source: ODNB on Edward, prince of Wales

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22
Aug

22 AUGUST 1485

   Posted by: Michael    in Events in History

Remember before God

Richard III

King of England

and those who fell at Bosworth Field

having kept faith.

22 August 1485

Loyaulte me lie.

(Text:  Richard III memorial plaque in the Church of St James, Sutton Cheney

Illustration on the left:  King Richard III,  © Andrew Jamieson, http://www.jamiesongallery.com/ (used with permission)

On the right:  The Church of St James, Sutton Cheney, where the Richard III Society commemorates King Richard III in its annual memorial service in August. It is said that Richard III heard his last Mass at this church.)


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18
Aug

What we admire most about Richard III

   Posted by: Kevin Herbert    in NSW Branch News

Richard III NSW Branch NewsOur last branch meeting took a completely different format.  Instead of all facing and listening to a speaker, we sat around a table and discussed what we admire most about Richard.

Jan, one of the longest serving members of our branch,  began by reminiscing about the origins of the NSW Branch of The Richard III Society.   Apparently in the 1970s a handful of Ricardians met in someone’s home, but as they became more numerous they ventured to a restaurant to share a meal together instead.  As the membership grew so, too, did the need to become more structured and meet in more formal surroundings, which got us to where we are today.

Our discussion showed that we all admire Richard for his loyalty to his friends and family, for his caring nature and thoughtfulness for the people as expressed by Richard’s innovative laws and justice.  Several members remarked that he worked to better the lives of ordinary people, citing several examples, among them especially the exemption of books and printing from taxation to foster learning.  This led to the idea to include a section on Richard’s achievements on our website, but we have to ensure only to include those reforms and innovations which can be easily proved.

Richard III

Illustration:  © Andrew Jamieson, www.andrewstewartjamieson.co.uk

More individual experiences were also aired.  Kevin was especially impressed by the closeness which seemed to exist between John Neville and Richard, whose mottos, respectively, were:  Loyalty, Honour and Love (John Neville) and Loyalty Binds Me (Richard). Judith commented on what a joy it was to discover medieval history after she had been immersed in Victorian matters previously.  This joy was shared by Win who also spoke of the joy of learning to appreciate medieval history.

Carol shared a special experience with us by thanking Richard and his family for one of her happiest memories in England when she and her husband went to Fotheringhay and enjoyed a perfect day there with a picnic.

She commented on the fact and that his achievements in such a short time were incredible in comparison with other monarchs who reigned for much longer and did comparatively little in the first few years of their reign.

New members Leslie and Doug remarked on how noble a person Richard seemed to be and how wonderful it was to meet up with a group who shared their passion for this great and underrated man.

Everyone felt this discussion was a very worthwhile exercise.  And we were all grateful to him for making his times so interesting to us all – and for bringing us together.

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25
Jul

25 JULY 1470

   Posted by: Michael    in Events in History

Betrothal of Anne Neville to Edward, prince of Wales, the son of Henry VI, at Angers Cathedral.  They married at Bayeux approx. 13 December.  Some time after Edward’s death at the battle of Tewkesbury on 7 May 1471, Anne married Richard, duke of Gloucester (future Richard III).

Source: ODNB on Anne Neville

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24
Jul

Richard III Visits Oxford University

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis    in Events in History

Richard III Visits Oxford University

Magdalen College, Oxford (© D Preis)

Richard III Visits Oxford University

Not long after his coronation, Richard III visited Oxford University as one of the first stops of his Royal Progress.  He stayed for 3 days, 24 to 26 July 1483, at Magdalen College on the invitation by the college’s founder, William Waynflete, bishop of Winchester.

Richard was “honourably received, firstly outside the University by the Chancellor of the University and by the Regents and non-Regents; then he was received honourably and in procession at the College of the Blessed Mary Magdalene by a speech by the lord Founder”.  The day after his reception, we see Richard following his own cultural taste. He listened to two debates, one on moral philosophy and one on theology.

I think Hairsine is right when he remarks:

There was certainly no need for a medieval autocrat to sit through not one but two learned debates if he did not find a genuine interest there.  One is lead to believe that Richard’s visits to Oxford and Cambridge were welcome interludes from the cares of government.

Richard seems to have been impressed with the debates as well as his welcome and rewarded the participants and Magdalen College handsomely with venison and cash.  The whole event was in detail recorded in the Register of Magdalen College, which the anonymous Chronicler ended with the words Vivat rex in eternum, which can be translated as a “may the King live forever!”.

On the last day of his visit, Saturday 26 July, the king toured the university, before travelling on to Woodstock.

References:

Robert C Hairsine, “Oxford University and the Life and Legend of Richard III”, in:  J Petre (ed.), Richard III:  Crown and People, Richard III Society, 1985, pp. 307-332

Rhoda Edwards, The Itinerary of King Richard III, 1483-1485. Richard III Society, 1983 , p.5

For the interesting history of Magdalen College, you can download an illustrated history book, The Story of Magdalen College Oxford, by Rena Gardiner from the College website.

Dorothea Preis

 

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