Posts Tagged ‘Church’

24
Feb

24 FEBRUARY 1151

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis    in Events in History

Geoffrey of Monmouth elected to the see of St Asaph in Wales.  It is assumed he was born between 1100 and 1110, and to have died between  25 December 1154 and 24 December 1155.

He is mainly known as a writer of the Historia Regum Britanniae (The history of the kings of Britain), which includes stories of Arthur, Merlin and kings Leir and Coel.

Geoffrey will always remind me of my classes in medieval Latin at university, where we studied his story of King Arthur.  Though I had disliked Latin at school and only did the course because it was a prerequisite for graduation, here I discovered that studying a ‘dead’ language could actually be fun.

Reference:

J. C. Crick, ‘Monmouth, Geoffrey of (d. 1154/5)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004.

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21
Feb

21 FEBRUARY 1478

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis    in Events in History

Richard Duke of Gloucester (later Richard III) obtains permission to found and endow two collegiate chapels at St Mary and St Akelda’s Church, Middleham, and at St Mary’s Church, Barnard Castle.

The college at Middleham was to have six priests, the one at Barnard Castle twelve.  The priests were to offer prayers for the souls of Richard himself, King Edward IV and his Queen Elizabeth, his brothers and sisters and his father, wife and son.

While the college at Barnard Castle never materialized due to Richard’s death at Bosworth, the college at Middleham was established and continued until 1856.

(Photograph of St Mary and St Alkelda, Middleham, by D Preis)

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29
Dec

29 DECEMBER 1170

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis    in Events in History

Archbishop Thomas Becket is murdered in Canterbury Cathedral by four knights.

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28
Dec

28 DECEMBER 1065

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis    in Events in History

Westminster Abbey is consecrated under Edward the Confessor.

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11
Nov

11 NOVEMBER 1483

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis    in Events in History

Baptism of Martin Luther in Eisleben, Germany, from which his date of birth, 10 November 1483, is deducted.

He disputed the claim of the (Catholic) church that salvation could be purchased by indulgences, instead salvation is a free gift by God, received by faith in Jesus, who has redeemed our sins.  He explained his view in the 95 thesis, which he nailed on the church door in Eisleben in the evening of 31 October 1517, the evening before All Saints’ Day, when everyone would come to church.   This is often regarded as the starting point of the reformation.  While his original aim was to reform the church, the Pope saw it differently, which ultimately led to the split with the Catholic church.  As Luther was of the opinion that the Bible was the only source for knowledge of God, he translated it into German to make it accessible to everyone.

He died on 15 February 1546.

You can find out more at http://www.luther.de/en/

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31
Oct

31 OCTOBER 1517

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis    in Events in History

Martin Luther (born 10 November 1483) nails his 95 thesis on the church door in Eisleben in the evening of 31 October 1517, because the next day, 1 November, is All Saints’ Day, when everyone would come to church.

In the 95 theses he explains his view based on the Gospel that salvation is a free gift from God and cannot be earned by good deeds or purchased by buying indulgences . This is often regarded as the starting point of the reformation.  While his original aim was to reform the church, the Pope saw it differently, which ultimately led to the split with the Catholic church.  As Luther was of the opinion that the Bible was the only source for knowledge of God, he translated it into German to make it accessible to everyone.

31 October is celebrated in the Lutheran church as Reformation Day commemorating Luther’s stand.

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11
Aug

EVENTS IN HISTORY: 11 AUGUST 1486

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis    in Events in History

Death of William Waynflete, Bishop of Winchester

Source: ODNB on William Waynflete

For more information on him see ‘The “elder statesman of the educational revolution”’.

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23
Jun

EVENTS IN HISTORY: BETWEEN 23 JUNE AND 10 JULY 1499

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis    in Events in History

Death of Thomas Barowe, loyal servant to Richard III.  In addition to long and distinguished career in the church, he was Richard’s Master of the Rolls from 22 September 1483 and Keeper of the Great Seal from approx. 1 August 1485.  The exact date of his death is not known, but his will was dated 23 June 1499 and proved on 10 July 1499.  In his will he remembers various other associates of Richard III.

In an indenture of 21 January 1495 to Great St Mary’s, Cambridge University church, he gave the enormous sum of £240 for building work at the church.  The indenture also included masses and prayers for Richard III and  Thomas Barowe himself.  Both were to be enrolled in the list of the benefactors of Cambridge University.  This shows a great deal of loyalty to his former patron, at a time when Barowe had made his peace with Henry VII and especially the king’s mother, Margaret Beaufort.

(Photograph of Great St Mary’s, Cambridge, by D Preis)

Further reading:

Christopher Brooke, ‘Urban church and university church:  Great St Mary’s from its origins to 1523′, in:  John Binns & Peter Meadows, Great St Mary’s, Cambridge University’s Church, Cambridge, 2000, pp.7-24.  ISBN 0521775027

A. F. Sutton and L. Visser-Fuchs, ‘’As dear to him as the Trojans were to Hector:’ Richard III and the University of Cambridge’, in:  L. Visser-Fuchs, ed, Richard III and East Anglia:  Magnates, Gilds and Learned Men.  Richard III Society, 2010, pp.105-142, in particular pp.130-134.

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3
Jun

EVENTS IN HISTORY: 3 JUNE 1162

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis    in Events in History

Thomas Becket consecrated as Archbishop of Canterbury.

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25
Dec

CHRISTMAS IN CAMBRIDGE

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis    in News

For the festive season here is a special – a segment of  ‘Carols from King’s’ in 2010 at King’s College Chapel, Cambridge, a chapel which was close to Richard’s heart. Beautiful singing in a beautiful setting.

King’s College Chapel, Cambridge (photograph:  Dorothea Preis)

On a visit to the King’s College Chapel in Cambridge more than 20 years ago, I bought a postcard showing “The Kings who built the Chapel”.  In spite of Henry VIII being depicted as the crowning glory, it was the inclusion of Richard III which made me buy the card.

King’s College was founded by Henry VI in 1441.  After Edward IV came to power very little was done to continue and it “suffered severely from [his] hostility”.[Ross, p.135] This changed dramatically, when Richard became King.  He gave instructions that “the building should go on with all possible despatch”.  The result was that by the end of his short reign part of the chapel was in use.[‘History of the Chapel’]

His strong support for the construction of King’s College Chapel was part of Richard’s close and long lasting attachment to the University of Cambridge.  While his connection to Oxford seems to have been cordial enough, his attachment to Cambridge was much closer.  He and his queen Anne Neville had an especially close relationship to Queens’ College, to which they made their first endowment in 1477.

Queens’ was originally founded by Margaret of Anjou and further supported by Elizabeth Woodville, who came to be regarded as a co-founder, which explains the name.  During Richard’s reign, when he made further grants to the College, Queen Anne was also considered a founder, but that was “conveniently forgotten when political circumstances changed in 1485.”[Ross, p.135]  However, Richard is not entirely forgotten:   the badge of the college includes till this day a silver boar’s head.  [‘The College Badge’, Queens’]

When recruiting, Richard displayed a marked preference for Cambridge rather than Oxford graduates.[Ross, pp.132-134]

The special attachment Richard felt to Cambridge was reciprocated by the university and they regarded “King Richard and Queen Anne as liberal benefactors”, who “deserved the annual mass which the university formally established in their honour on the morrow of their state visit in 1484”.[Ross, p.136}

Enjoy the beautiful music.  And may your holidays be happy and peaceful!

Sources:
‘History of the Chapel’, King’s College Cambridge.  URL:  http://www.kings.cam.ac.uk/chapel/history.html Date accessed: 27 July 2010 – This also includes a sketch showing the different construction phases.

‘The Heraldic Arms’, Queens’ College Cambridge.  URL:  http://www.queens.cam.ac.uk/general-information/historical-fun/queens-college/the-heraldic-arms Date accessed: 1 August 2010

‘The colleges and halls: King’s', A History of the County of Cambridge and the Isle of Ely: Volume 3: The City and University of Cambridge (1959), pp. 376-408. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66649 Date accessed: 11 March 2010

Charles Ross, Richard III.  Methuen, London, 1988

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