Posts Tagged ‘Church’

23
Jun

Death of Thomas Barowe

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis    in Events in History

Death of Thomas Barowe

Great St Mary’s, Cambridge (© D Preis)

Death of Thomas Barowe

The death of Thomas Barowe, loyal servant to Richard III, occurred during the period 23 June to 10 July 1499.  In addition to a long and distinguished career in the church, Thomas Barowe was Richard’s Master of the Rolls from 22 September 1483 and Keeper of the Great Seal from approx. 1 August 1485.  The exact date of his death is not known, but his will was dated 23 June 1499 and proved on 10 July 1499, therefore it must have occurred between these two dates.  In his will he remembers various other associates of Richard III.

In an indenture of 21 January 1495 to Great St Mary’s, Cambridge University church, he gave the enormous sum of £240 for building work at the church.  The indenture also included masses and prayers for Richard III and  Thomas Barowe himself.  Both were to be enrolled in the list of the benefactors of Cambridge University.  This shows a great deal of loyalty to his former patron, at a time when Barowe had made his peace with Henry VII and especially the king’s mother, Margaret Beaufort.

Further reading:

Christopher Brooke, ‘Urban church and university church:  Great St Mary’s from its origins to 1523′, in:  John Binns & Peter Meadows, Great St Mary’s, Cambridge University’s Church, Cambridge, 2000, pp.7-24.  ISBN 0521775027 (this chapter is available online from http://assets.cambridge.org/97805217/75021/sample/9780521775021wsc00.pdf)

A. F. Sutton and L. Visser-Fuchs, ‘’As dear to him as the Trojans were to Hector:’ Richard III and the University of Cambridge’, in:  L. Visser-Fuchs, ed, Richard III and East Anglia:  Magnates, Gilds and Learned Men.  Richard III Society, 2010, pp.105-142, in particular pp.130-134.

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3
Jun

3 JUNE 1162

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis    in Events in History

Thomas Becket consecrated as Archbishop of Canterbury.

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24
Feb

24 FEBRUARY 1151

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis    in Events in History

Geoffrey of Monmouth elected to the see of St Asaph in Wales.  It is assumed he was born between 1100 and 1110, and to have died between  25 December 1154 and 24 December 1155.

He is mainly known as a writer of the Historia Regum Britanniae (The history of the kings of Britain), which includes stories of Arthur, Merlin and kings Leir and Coel.

Geoffrey will always remind me of my classes in medieval Latin at university, where we studied his story of King Arthur.  Though I had disliked Latin at school and only did the course because it was a prerequisite for graduation, here I discovered that studying a ‘dead’ language could actually be fun.

Reference:

J. C. Crick, ‘Monmouth, Geoffrey of (d. 1154/5)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004.

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21
Feb

21 FEBRUARY 1478

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis    in Events in History

Richard Duke of Gloucester (later Richard III) obtains permission to found and endow two collegiate chapels at St Mary and St Akelda’s Church, Middleham, and at St Mary’s Church, Barnard Castle.

The college at Middleham was to have six priests, the one at Barnard Castle twelve.  The priests were to offer prayers for the souls of Richard himself, King Edward IV and his Queen Elizabeth, his brothers and sisters and his father, wife and son.

While the college at Barnard Castle never materialized due to Richard’s death at Bosworth, the college at Middleham was established and continued until 1856.

(Photograph of St Mary and St Alkelda, Middleham, by D Preis)

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29
Dec

Murder of Thomas Becket

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis    in Events in History

Murder of Thomas Becket

Murder of Thomas Becket from an English psalter.

Murder of Thomas Becket

On 29 December 1170, Archbishop Thomas Becket was murdered in Canterbury Cathedral by four knights.

More information here.

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28
Dec

Westminster Abbey Consecrated

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis    in Events in History

Westminster Abbey consecrated

Westminster Abbey (© D Preis)

Westminster Abbey Consecrated

On 28 December 1065, Westminster Abbey was consecrated under Edward the Confessor.

More information on Edward the Confessor and Westminster Abbey here.

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6
Dec

Another chance to win tickets

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis    in News, Reinterment

Leicester Cathedral - CopyGood news. There will be various services at Leicester Cathedral to commemorate Richard III during THAT week in March 2015. About a week ago, members of the Richard III Society received their ballot papers to try and get one of the sought-after seats for one of the services.

Yesterday Leicester Cathedral announced that it will be making 200 seats available for members of the general public, representing one third of all the seating in the Cathedral. This will include the following services:

  • Sunday, 22 March (6.00pm) – evening service of Compline, at which the Catholic Archbishop of Westminster, Cardinal Vincent Nichols, will preach the sermon
  • Thursday, 26 March (11.30am) – the reburial, culminating in the lowering of the coffin below ground into the specially designed tomb
  • Friday, 27 March (12.00 noon) – Richard III’s tomb will be revealed

This ballot offers another chance to win a ticket for one of the services. As this ballot is open to the public, it does not include the special service for members of the Richard III Society on Monday, 23 March (7.00pm).

As Revd. Pete Hobson, Canon Missioner and Project Manager, explained on Facebook, “anyone can enter the ballot, for one, two or all three services, but each person will only be selected once and we can’t guarantee for which service if you out in for more than one”. They will also coordinate the allocation of tickets from their ballot with that of the Richard III Society, so that no one gets “double invites”, thus allowing as many people as possible to have a chance to attend one of the services.

Revd. Pete also mentioned that they hope to open the Cathedral to the public by mid-afternoon on Friday, 27 March, to pay their respects at the tomb.

The ballot will open on Friday 12th December, 100 days before the week of events, at 8.00 am (UK time), which is 5.00pm AEST, and close at midday (9.00pm AEST) on 31 December. The lucky ones who will be invited, wll be notified by letter, which are expected to be sent out in the week beginning 12 January. This is the same week, when the Richard III Society will notify those members, who were successful in being chosen.

To find out more about the ballot, visit the website of the Diocese of Leicester (this includes a link to the ballot):
http://www.leicester.anglican.org/news/details/public-ballot-for-king-richard-lll-services

More about the services:
http://www.leicestercathedralkingrichardiii.org/plans/

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11
Nov

11 NOVEMBER 1483

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis    in Events in History

Baptism of Martin Luther in Eisleben, Germany, from which his date of birth, 10 November 1483, is deducted.

He disputed the claim of the (Catholic) church that salvation could be purchased by indulgences, instead salvation is a free gift by God, received by faith in Jesus, who has redeemed our sins.  He explained his view in the 95 thesis, which he nailed on the church door in Eisleben in the evening of 31 October 1517, the evening before All Saints’ Day, when everyone would come to church.   This is often regarded as the starting point of the reformation.  While his original aim was to reform the church, the Pope saw it differently, which ultimately led to the split with the Catholic church.  As Luther was of the opinion that the Bible was the only source for knowledge of God, he translated it into German to make it accessible to everyone.

He died on 15 February 1546.

You can find out more at http://www.luther.de/en/

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31
Oct

31 OCTOBER 1517

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis    in Events in History

Martin Luther (born 10 November 1483) nails his 95 thesis on the church door in Eisleben in the evening of 31 October 1517, because the next day, 1 November, is All Saints’ Day, when everyone would come to church.

In the 95 theses he explains his view based on the Gospel that salvation is a free gift from God and cannot be earned by good deeds or purchased by buying indulgences . This is often regarded as the starting point of the reformation.  While his original aim was to reform the church, the Pope saw it differently, which ultimately led to the split with the Catholic church.  As Luther was of the opinion that the Bible was the only source for knowledge of God, he translated it into German to make it accessible to everyone.

31 October is celebrated in the Lutheran church as Reformation Day commemorating Luther’s stand.

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7
Sep

Two Archbishops and a King

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis    in News, Reinterment

Leicester Cathedral - CopyIt has just been announced that both the Cardinal Archbishop of Westminster and the Archbishop of Canterbury will be taking part in services in Leicester Cathedral to mark the reinterment of King Richard III.  The Cardinal Archbishop of Westminster is the most senior clergy of the Catholic Church in the UK and the Archbishop of Canterbury is his counterpart in the Church of England/Anglican Church.

Since Richard’s remains were found two years ago, the Anglican Diocese of Leicester has worked closely with the Catholic Diocese of Nottingham, which includes Leicester, to ensure that the reburial will be handled with dignity and honour.

Anglican and Catholic clergy will celebrate at major as well as other services during the week 22 to 28 March 2015.  At the reburial service on 26 March, other Christian denominations as well as the World Faiths will be represented.

It has been occasionally been said that Leicester Cathedral is too modern for a medieval monarch.  While it is true that its modern Cathedral status is relatively new (1927), there were already Bishops of Leicester from the 7th to the 9th century.  The actual church was built by the Normans, replacing an earlier Saxon church.  The Norman church was rebuilt and enlarged during the 13th and 15th century.  So we can assume that Richard would have been very much aware of the church during his visits to Leicester.

You can find the full schedule of the planned services here.

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