Posts Tagged ‘Richard III’

12
Jun

12 JUNE 1461

   Posted by: Lawrence Osborn    in Events in History

Richard and his brother George return to England from exile in Burgundy, where they had been sent for their safety after the Yorkist defeat at the Battle of Wakefield, West Yorkshire (30 December 1460).

The photograph shows Ghent (© Dorothea Preis)

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11
Jun

11 JUNE 1915

   Posted by: Lawrence Osborn    in Events in History

RIII Memorial Stone, Leicester Cathedral

RIII Memorial Stone, Leicester Cathedral

David Guy Barnabas Kindersley, stone-carver and type designer, born in Codicote, Hertfordshire. Among his work is the Richard III Memorial Stone, which used to be in Leicester Cathedral.  The stone is now on loan to the King Richard III Visitor Centre,which also allows access to Richard’s original grave

In the Ricardian Bulletin of December 1982 Jeremy Potter in his AGM report said the following:

“The Leicester Memorial Stone, carved by David Kindersley, dedicated in August, was not a Society project, but that of the Rev T.C.Hunter-Clare; however the Society was glad to have been able to contribute and had much appreciated the dedication service.”

At the previous year’s AGM he said: “The Society had made an initial small donation and a larger later one”.

Around this time the  Leicester Statue fund was wound up and it was agreed the residue would be used for special projects “such as the Leicester Cathedral Memorial and Fotheringhay Chapel.”

More information on David Kindersley: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/obituariesdavid-kindersley-1571426.html

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18
May

18 MAY 1471

   Posted by: Lawrence Osborn    in Events in History

Richard, Duke of Gloucester, named Great Chamberlain and Lord High Admiral of England by his brother Edward IV.

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1
May

Not Guilty – Again

   Posted by: Dorothea Preis    in News

Last Sunday, 29 April 2018, another trial was convened to establish whether Richard III was guilty of ordering the death of his two nephews in the Tower, as well as the death of his brother George, duke of Clarence.  This was a special fundraising event produced by the Shakespeare Schools Foundation.  It was the fourth of its kind, similar trials were staged before:  Romeo for the murder of Tybalt, Macbeth, and Hamlet for the murder of Polonius.

The idea of these productions is to bring together well-known actors and young people to perform in a one night only theatrical production.  In this trial, children from three London schools acted out scenes to form evidence, supported by actors Tony Gardner (Clarence), Kae Alexander (Lady Anne),  and David Oakes (Duke of Buckingham).

Add to this legal professionals as judge (Lady Justice Hallett), as well as for the prosecution (Ian Winter QC and Jonathan Laidlaw QC) and the defence (John Kelsey-Fry QC and Sallie Bennett-Jenkins QC).  The jury was the audience, with comedian Hugh Dennis as the foreman, which was to decide whether Richard was guilty or not.

You may remember that Lady Justice Hallett had also presided over the judicial review hearings in 2014.  There the question was the legality of the exhumation licence granted by the Secretary of State before remains, which eventually were identified as Richard’s, were dug up in Leicester in 2012.  The result of this earlier court case ultimately decided that Richard was reburied in Leicester Cathedral in March 2015.  As all of us, who were in the city at the time, will agree, this was a very moving and memorable event, carried out with all the respect we could have wished for.

In Sunday’s performance, the storyline was told that Richard had been arrested at Bosworth in 1485 before being killed by Henry Tudor’s forces.  In the trial, two freelance assassins gave evidence that they had been hired by a middleman to kill the nephews, but could not state definitely whether the orders originally came from the king.

Richard’s queen, Anne, traditionally portrayed as rather mild and innocent, here came across as ambitious, who shifted her allegiance to whoever was in power.  Richard explained that he didn’t need to eliminate the princes, as they had been declared illegitimate by an Act of Parliament.  Neither did he need to kill his brother, who drowned in a butt of Malmsey.

Against all these arguments brought forward by the defence, the prosecution could only argue that he was a “deformed hunchback” and “nature is repulsed by him”.  This clearly did not seem to be sufficient for the jury, which found the king ‘Not Guilty”.

 

Further reading:

‘Trial of Richard III on 29 April 2018’, Shakespeare Schools Foundation.  URL:  https://www.shakespeareschools.org/support-us/trial [last accessed 1 May 2018]

Bowcott, O., ‘My naked villany: top judge to preside over West End trial of Richard III’, The Guardian (21 April 2018).  URL:  https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/apr/20/judge-trial-of-richard-iii-play-lady-justice-hallett [last accessed 1 May 2018]

Sanderson, D., ‘Richard III cleared of murder (on a hunch)’, The Times (30 April 2018).  URL:  https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/richard-iii-cleared-of-murder-on-a-hunch-xtkhlr5qn [last accessed 1 May 2018]

‘Trial of Shakespeare’s Richard III – King Not Guilty’, The Richard III Society (29 April 2018).  URL:  http://www.richardiii.net/whats_new.php#ytrial [last accessed 1 May 2018)

Information on the Judicial Review: 

Cranmer, F., ‘Richard III reburial: judicial review application fails’, Law & Religion UK (23 May 2014).  URL:  http://www.lawandreligionuk.com/2014/05/23/richard-iii-reburial-judicial-review-application-fails/ [last accessed 1 May 2018]

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14
Apr

14 APRIL 1471

   Posted by: Lawrence Osborn    in Events in History

Battle of Barnet, Hertfordshire, defeat of Warwick and his brother Montagu, who both fell in the battle.  Richard is said to have been in command of the vanguard.

Read more about a possible different location for the battle here.

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9
Apr

9 APRIL 1483

   Posted by: Lawrence Osborn    in Events in History

Edward IV dies at Westminster, buried at St Georges Chapel, Windsor.  It is assumed that he named his brother Richard, Duke of Gloucester, as Lord Protector of England during his son Edward’s minority.

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29
Mar

Battle of Towton

   Posted by: Lawrence Osborn    in Events in History

Battle of Towton

Towton Cross

Battle of Towton – the bloodiest battle ever fought on English soil

The Battle of Towton , regarded as  “the largest and bloodiest battle ever fought on English soil”, was fought in a snow storm on Palm Sunday, 29 March 1461, between the Lancastrian forces of King Henry VI and the Yorkist forces led by Edward, Earl of March.  It has been said that 28,000 men died that day, out of 50,000 to 100,000 soldiers.  The result was a Yorkist victory and Edward became king as Edward IV.

In 1996 a mass grave of fallen soldiers was found at Towton Hall.  Their remains have been studied by the University of Bradford.

Edward IV had planned to build a memorial chapel at Towton, but it was Richard III, who put this plan into action.  The chapel was nearly finished, when he was killed at Bosworth, and the chapel had been lost.  Or so it was thought.  In October 2013 it was revealed that scientists had found strong evidence of remains of the chapel.

In 2010 fragments of hand held guns and lead shot were found at the battle site, the earliest ever to be found.

References:

Helen Cox, ‘Towton: the Battle and the Battlefield Society’, Herstory Writing & Interpretation (4 Sept 2010).  Link “Towton” on URL:  http://helencox-herstorywriting.co.uk/#/articles/4539783477  Date accessed:  19 Oct 2010

T. Sutherland & A. Schmidt,’The Towton Battlefield Archaeological Survey Project:  An Integrated Approach to Battlefield Archaeology’, Landscapes, Vol.4, Issue 2 (October 2003), pp.15-25.  Available from URL:  http://bradscholars.brad.ac.uk:8080/bitstream/handle/10454/818/Towton03-Preprint.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y  Date accessed:  30 December 2014

‘Richard III Towton chapel remains are ‘found’’, BBC News York & North Yorkshire (7 Oct 2013).  URL:  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-york-north-yorkshire-24434795  Date accessed:  8 Oct 2013

A short description of the various battles of the Wars of the Roses can be found on the website of the Richard III Society.

Dorothea Preis

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28
Mar

END OF MARCH 1484

   Posted by: Lawrence Osborn    in Events in History

Death of Edward of Middleham, only son of Richard III and Anne Neville

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20
Mar

20 MARCH 687

   Posted by: Lawrence Osborn    in Events in History

Death of St Cuthbert at Inner Farne Island, off the coast of Northumberland.  He is venerated at Durham Cathedral.

He must have had special relevance for Richard III, as the statutes for his college at Middleham, which it has been suggested Richard might have written himself, state that one of the stalls for the priests should be named for St Cuthbert.  St Cuthbert’s was one of the principal feast days to be celebrated at Middleham.

 

Further reading:

Melhuish, Joyce M., The College of King Richard III, Middleham.  Richard III Society (nd)

Rollason, David & Dobson, R.B., ‘Cuthbert [St Cuthbert] (c.635–687)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004.  URL:  http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/6976 Date accessed: 18 July 2011

Sutton, Anne F. & Visser Fuchs, Livia, The Hours of Richard III.  Alan Sutton Publishing Ltd (first published 1990, paperback 1996)

Dorothea Preis

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16
Mar

16 MARCH 1485

   Posted by: Lawrence Osborn    in Events in History

Death of Richard III’s wife Anne Neville at Westminster, probably of tuberculosis.  She was buried at Westminster Abbey, but the location of her grave is unknown.  It is often said that Richard openly wept at her funeral, though the origin of this assumption is unclear.  There is a plaque for her at Westminster Abbey donated by the Richard III Society.  Unfortunately it does not get mentioned in the audio guide, so you have to look out for it.

The illustration on the left is from the in memoriam card which accompanied the wreath for Queen Anne’s tomb at Westminster in 2007. (© Richard III Society)

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